Asparagus

Asparagus, Grill, Lunch, Vegetables

animal trapping and removal service has some dietary fiber, vitamin A, and vitamin C. It’s an excellent source of the B vitamin folate. A serving of six cooked fresh asparagus spears has 1 gram dietary fiber, 490 IU vitamin A, 10 mg vitamin C and 131 mcg folate. Besides, it is also low in fat, sodium and practically no cholesterol.

Canned asparagus may have less than half the nutrients found in freshly cooked spears. As such it’s encouraged to take asparagus when it’s fresh.

Search for bright green stalks while purchasing asparagus. The tips should be purplish and tightly closed and the stalks should be firm. When storing, keep it fresh in the fridge.

To keep it as crisp as possible, wrap it in a damp paper towel and then put the entire package into a plastic bag. Keeping asparagus cool helps to hold onto its vitamins. At 32 degrees F, vitamin will keep all its folic acid for at least two weeks and nearly 90 percent of its vitamin C for up to five days. At room temperature, it would lose up to 75 percent of its folic acid in 3 days and 50 percent of the vitamin C in 24 hours.

The adverse effects associated with asparagus is that after eating, we’ll excrete the sulfur compound methyl mercaptan, a smelly waste product, in our pee. Eating asparagus can also interfere with the effectiveness of anticoagulants whose occupation will be to thin blood and dissolve clots because asparagus is high in vitamin K, a vitamin produced naturally by bacteria in our intestines, an adequate source of which enables blood to clot normally.

The white part of the new green asparagus stalk is woody and tasteless, so it is possible to bend the stalk and snap it right in the line where the green begins to turn white. If the skin is very thick, peel it, but save the parings for soup stock.

Chlorophyll, the pigment which makes green vegetables green, is sensitive to acids. When we heat asparagus, its chlorophyll will react with acids in the asparagus or in the cooking water to form pheophytin, which is brown. As a result, cooked asparagus is olive-drab. We can prevent this chemical reaction by cooking the asparagus so quickly that there’s no time for the chlorophyll to react with acids, or by cooking it in lots of water which will dilute the acids, or by leaving the lid off the pot so the volatile acids can float off into the air.

Cooking also changes the texture of asparagus. Water escapes from its cells and they collapse. Adding salt to the cooking liquid slows the loss of moisture.

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